Robert S. Smith
Aerospace Education Mentor
Last Updated April 2nd, 2006    Contact Bo Smith
Exploring Planetary Geology Workshop
Saturday, April 1st, 2006
8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

AGENDA

Presented by:  Robert S. "Bo" Smith
                      Aerospace Education Mentor (AEM)
                      Florida Space Research Institute (FSRI)
email:  bo_smith@bellsouth.net
websites:   http://exploring-moon-mars-geology.org
                http://users.ilnk.com/Bo_Smith/

8:00 a.m. Introduction and Administrative Details

                Discuss Day Two Workshop/Tour at Kennedy Space Center-
                Friday, May 26th, 2006

Morning: Conduct activities to provide the prerequisite content to support the afternoon
                Earth’s Moon and Mars surface geology activities.
 

Power Point Presentation: NASA’s Space Exploration Initiative
 

Mineral Activity: Learn about rock forming minerals including standard techniques used to identify minerals.
                                  (Tarbuck,  Lutgens, and Pinzke- ‘Applications & Investigations Earth Science)

Activity: Identification of Igneous Rocks:  Learn to use the texture and color of igneous rocks to identify typical igneous rocks and determine
                 how the rocks were formed and the composition (source of the magma/lava) of igneous rocks.
                  (Guided Inquiry Activity-Conceptual Change Model Lesson Plan)

Sedimentary Rocks: Learn about types of sedimentray rocks, how they are formed, and what to look for to determine whether a rock is of
                 igneous or sedimentary origin, specifically when deposition in liquid is involved..  (Various sources including Tarbuck,  Lutgens, and Pinzke-
                 ‘Applications & Investigations Earth Science).  Also included is a 'Power Point' based discussion concerning how the presence of water can
                  cause chermical weathering which can be observed when examining rocks.

Break- (15 Minutes)

Activity- ‘Albedo, What is it and can we measure it?: Learn about albedo and why it is important in space science and planetary
                   geology.  Tarbuck, Lutgens, and Pinzke- ‘Applications &  Investigations in Earth Science'    (Structured Inquiry)
 

Short Break:
 

Power Point Presentation- Relative Age: Learning the basics about how to determine the order of geologic events.
              (Tarbuck, Lutgens, and Pinzke- ‘Applications & Investigations in Earth Science), (Mr. Bo's Earth Hiistory Review CD)
 

Power Point Presentation- Shaping the Earth's Surface by Running Water':  Includes Satellite Images of Drainage Basin Topography-
             Tarbuck, Lutgens, and Pinzke- ‘Applications & Investigations in Earth Science’
 

12:15 p.m.- Lunch (45 minutes)
 

Afternoon: Exploring Moon and Mars Geology Activities

Determining the Surface Composition of Earth’s Moon:  Use remote sensor imagery and lessons learned from the morning session to
                determine the composition of the Lunar highlands with Lunar Maria.  (Guided Inquiry-Conceptual Change Model Lesson Pan)

Mar Mapping Activity:   Using remote sensing imagery and lessons learned from the morning session, determine a simple geologic history of
                                                Mars. (Guided Inquiry-Conceptual Change Model Lesson Pan)

Break (15 minutes)

Mars Rocks Activity: Using lessons learned from the morning activity, can you identify which of the types of rocks in a collection of potential
   Mars rocks are of igneous or sedimentary origin? (Guided Inquiry)

Discussion: What conditions exist on Mars which may alter geologic processes when compared to Earth?

Short Break

Activity- Determining the Composition of Planetary Surfaces Using Reflectance Spectrometry:Using an Alta 2 Reflectant Spectrometer, test several types of sand and generate data which may be used to identify the composition of samples pf lunar regolith simulant and Mars Regolith simulant.  Learn how the CRISM (Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars) instrument onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) will use infra-red reflantant spectrometry to identify the composition of Mars regolith at prospective landing sites for future Mars robotic missions (Phoenix Scout Lander and the Mars Science Lab Rover).

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